installation

Unless by Stephanie Cardon, 2018

Photo by Ryan McMahon

Photo by Ryan McMahon

In this dramatic floor-to-ceiling installation at the entrance to the landmark Prudential Center marketplace, Cardon used orange construction debris netting, made by many hands from the Boston community and embroidered with text from the Pope’s 2015 Encyclical, Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home. The vibrant contemporary tapestry disrupted the cool marble and glass entrance, posing questions of climate justice and sustainability, and the mounting urgency to act together to effect positive change.

UNLESS was commissioned by Boston Properties and produced and curated by Now + There with our friends at Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, Villa Victoria Center for the Arts, Massachusetts College of Art, and Boston Center for the arts.

Climate change knows no borders and nationalities but its effect is putting further strain on the divisions we see across race and class. This is the time to come together across our differences to care for each other and our common home.
— Stephanie Cardon

Open House by Liz Glynn, 2018

Liz Glynn. Installation view, Open House, 2018, on Commonwealth Ave Mall. Cast Concrete. Organized for Boston by Now + There, Open House was commissioned and originally presented in 2017 by Public Art Fund in Central Park, New York in cooperation with the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery.

Liz Glynn. Installation view, Open House, 2018, on Commonwealth Ave Mall. Cast Concrete. Organized for Boston by Now + There, Open House was commissioned and originally presented in 2017 by Public Art Fund in Central Park, New York in cooperation with the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery.

At the turn of the 20th century, New England’s wealthy elite gathered in opulent private salons and ballrooms in Boston to define their social status. These gathering spaces were the seat of power, privilege, and politics in the city. Open House, an installation created by Los Angeles-based, Boston-born artist Liz Glynn, is organized for the Commonwealth Avenue Mall by Now + There. Originally commissioned by the Public Art Fund in cooperation with the artist and Paula Cooper GalleryOpen House was first presented at Doris C. Freedman Plaza in Central Park, New York. This new installment of Open House transforms the Commonwealth Avenue Mall West into an open air ruin of a ballroom. In this work the artist highlights class distinctions and the dynamics between public and private space and beckons you to take a seat and linger. Bringing this work to Boston during a time of rapid development, we are sparking a dialogue about economic inequality and supporting Glynn’s desire to incite -more- future action